Tech

Euclidion SOLIDSCAN

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Very impressive visuals. I’m a little skeptical though. Still I’m very happy to see more technical pushes away from the limitations of polygonal information and into more voxel stuff. I find their move to freely scan monuments a smart one for acquiring cool places. I wonder though how they map everything from a technical perspective. Surely somehow it’s mapped onto polygons… right? I’m particularly curious how they handle cracks and hard to see angles and probably most curious about how they handle the distant trees in a forest. My guess would be they’re somehow floating voxels in space… but our current hardware technology/consoles are so optimized towards polygonal rendering (i remember an old Carmack article where he was talking of when games/hardware could’ve taken a different direction) that changing direction so seriously might be impossibly hard. Still, it’s great to see them try!

Why the shift in creative software sales’ model may affect us for the better

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I’m quite excited. I am truly excited! No, I am deeply excited! There is a progressive shift that is happening in software sales’ model that is going to affect a lot of people: affordable or subscription-based licenses, for high-end, professional creative software in particular. I won’t go too deep into the criticisms and caveats of this shift today, but I’ll rather try to explore how it may affect the creative community, if not every creative person, in a positive manner.

More affordable, centralized, accessible tools

When Epic introduced their subscription model for the 4th generation of their Unreal Engine, I… actually could believe my eyes. But, I was facing an example of an incredible shift that’s happening in software nowadays: an engine’s source code that used to cost a million bucks was now available to anyone, for 19€ a month? If game creation in general was already accessible, with this new software generation, it is now high end, very technical creation tools that are at every single person’s fingertips.

And it’s not only Epic! On mobile devices and Mac, productivity tools and entertainment apps have shared affordable prices for a couple of years already. But more recently, this movement has started affecting the whole PC world: Steam, a mainstream gaming platform, now features professional grade creation software! It promotes innovative tools that are used on big productions like Substance, Sonar or even 3d Coat. Even the CryEngine was added to the list lately. New tools released there tend to be [relatively] cheap. And not only that, but they generally offer ergonomic User Interfaces. In other words, we’re getting strong tools, smart tools, and cheap tools centralized in a common marketplace.

I like that compact kind of environment, as it brings the developers and users closer together: Steam provides forums, articles, a newsfeed, and links to get in touch with the software authors rather quickly. In other words, we get the benefits of the social functionality of the platform. This facilitates bug reports, feature requests and other kinds of feedback.

Now, don’t get me wrong on this: Steam is far from being the best platforms for software. I would love to see the Steam Workshop and Guide features used more often to share tutorials and resources among users for example, just like it’s done in games. Content presentation isn’t always structured in the most efficient way for professional users as well, who will often favor the tool’s official website. But I do think that this broader diffusion of software represents a solid step towards open tools, accessible tools, thus smarter tools.

Subscription-based models or the promise of faster release cycles

This trend is a more recent one: to ensure user loyalty, regular revenue, and to prevent piracy, the creators of various tools are choosing more and more to use subscription-based licensing. Adobe product users have made some noise when they got forced to rent their software for a monthly fee (that rattle started in 2013, as Adobe stopped to deliver definitive licenses for all of its tools, increasing drastically licensing fees for many firms and individual users). Microsoft already does this with the Office 365 suite as well.

First of all, I do think that the accessibility in terms of pricing is once again synonym of broader communities. Those tools aren’t priced far less than before though: it is a matter of entry price point. Because the subscription is billed monthly, the cost may feel easier to handle. Only a little amount of money is being charged at a time, and the user can cancel after a month or a year if the toolset just doesn’t fit. The cloud-based licensed tools do come along with nicer packages as well: some cloud storage, a limited access to a subset of companion products… even if those features are meant to retain the user within the brand’s environment!

I do think that the steady flow of income the firm gets from it is not only healthy for it from an economic standpoint, but it forces the development team to accelerate the tool’s release cycle.  We can already see it with the Adobe tools, which get a couple of features added every 4 to 6 months (there was only a release per year before). However, I guess that users deserve to have the choice between subscribing and buying a definitive license, which is still too often not the case. But this is a topic for another article!

 

Did this trend in software sales affect the way you use your computer? Did they permit you to get new tools to express your creativity with? Don’t hesitate to share your experience with us and everyone in the comments below! We are always glad to get in touch with you.

You can also message me directly on social networks (facebook, twitter or google plus)!

Unreal Engine 4 Features Trailer

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Exciting tools. Can’t wait for the great artwork games of the future!

3D scanning going mainstream?

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It’s quite exciting to see the popularity 3d printers are getting and today I just found out there’s actually a 329€ scanner out there already. Wuuhuu!! good times in the future :D

And it seems a company even managed to use Kinect for scanning:

Steam Machines

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They look quite cool, I’m just afraid after seeing some eyewatering prices.

3d from photos

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Wow, i had no idead the technology was this far advanced that normal people can do it!

Blender Game Engine Tech Demo

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I’ve been for many years a big fan of Blender and am continuously amazed at how powerful it is and what people use it for. I only think of it as a fantastic 3d suite which happens to not cost thousands of $ but be free, but it seems others use it as a game engine and even for simulations and video compositing. Very awe inspiring!

Snowdrop Engine

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Quite impressive stuff, I must say. Seems like the kind of stuff worth getting a ps4 for… when it comes out :D I’m quite curious how they did the snow, and the light through bullets show was quite impressive, I wonder what delicious trickery is done there as surely they can’t simulate the whole world, yet somehow they smartly figured out that there’s light there. Quite beautiful. The dog by the trashcans was also amazing.

From Dust Tech Demo

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Haven’t really played much of the game but the landcape modification idea is very interesting technically and otherwise, plus my artistic hero Bruno Gentile has worked on it so i just MUST post it :D

PS: just found out as I was posting this that Eric Chahi, the brilliant mind behind the amazing Another World is behind this game!

CryEngine Next Gen Demo

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The puddle drying is quite impressive.

Programming a game Player

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Pretty surprising approach (with nice academic background)… I thought it would do something based on screen recognition, but it’s surprising that his much more base approach works even though it doesn’t make sense in the way we think and has a very abstract concept.

Steam now on Linux too!!!

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steam for linux

Wow! something huge happened these days. Something so big I almost forgot how many years I’ve been waiting for: Steam started supporting Linux. This is epic big. This kind of stuff I could only dream of when I was a graphics writer for a Linux magazine… so all those of us who like that very special operating system will now have a new level of fun on it! I’m thinking mostly of the chain links due to this too, that more pc developers might support the platform more too now that such a big game delivery platform is there. Yeayy!

L.A. Noire Facial Capture Technology

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I was sure I had posted this one, but can’t find it, so reposting it.

Return of the Voxels?

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To me it seems too good to be true (why isn’t it implemented with actual game content?), but if it’s real it would be a major game changer. Beyond just graphics this would finally open up something i’ve been waiting for for ages: truly physics based environments, objects with volumes, not just polygons….

Does anybody know more about this?

FOV in games

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For those into how things work, optics, photography or game development… and even insight about a reason why some games might make you dizzy. This is from Feng Zhu School of Design, most of their tutorials are concept art related but this was something i thought more people might be interested in.

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